About Us

Joshua Tree Skin Care (JTree) offers a collection of organic lip balms, healing salves and face sticks designed for those who lead an active outdoor lifestyle. Originally established in a small town outside of Joshua Tree National Park, JTree's healing salve immediately gained a loyal following among the rock climbing community. As the word spread to cyclists, runners, hikers, skiers and gymnasts, JTree added additional items to keep their customers outside, on the go and doing what they love.

From its new home in Southeast Michigan, JTree's team of on-the-go climbers, cyclists, runners and skiers continues to research and develop potent herbal products that heal skin after tough workouts and protect it from the effects of harsh natural elements.


-NEW- Body Wash

Salve

Climbing Salve

$1.50

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Cycling Salve

$1.50

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Gymnasts Salve

$1.50

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Healing Salve

$1.50

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Hiking Salve

$1.50

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Musicians Salve

$1.50

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Paddler's Salve

$1.50

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Pet Salve

$1.50

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Water Sports Salve

$1.50

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Sun Protection

SPF 30 Lotion

$9.00

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SPF 15 Lotion

$8.00

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News

'Healthy' for women to sunbathe: Swedish study


    The study followed up on almost 30,000 women over a 20-year period.

    "The mortality rate among avoiders of sun exposure was approximately two-fold higher compared to the highest sun exposure group," the Karolinksa and Lund university researchers concluded in an article published in the Journal of Internal Medicine.
     
    The researchers said that in countries that don't see a lot of sunshine, like Sweden, it could in fact be harmful for public health campaigners to tell people to stay out of the sun. 
     
    "Following sun exposure advice that is very restrictive in countries with low solar intensity might in fact be harmful to women’s health, resulting in excess mortality with a population," Lindqvist's team concluded.
     
    While fair-skinned women living in sunny climates had the highest skin cancer rates, sun should not be considered the worst enemy for a woman because exposure increases Vitamin D levels, the scientists noted. 
     
    And once a person had developed a cancerous mole, low Vitamin D levels appears to have a link, albeit not explained in the study, to whether the patient had a fighting chance to beat the cancer or not. 
     
    "Low vitamin D concentrations have also been linked to thicker, more aggressive melanomas with shorter survival times," the study synopsis read.
     
    To make sure the research was thorough, the women who filled out a survey had to answer questions not only about how much time they spent in the sun. They also had to tell the scientists about their education, whether they smoked, if they had a life partner, and the number of pregnancies they'd had. The questions also looked at the women's weight-to-height ratio or BMI, and how often they played sports or worked out. Income was also included as a factor.
     
    Overall, women who had very little sun exposure suffered higher "all-cause mortality". Put simply, more of  the non-sunbathers in the study had died in past two decades than the sun lovers. But they died, broadly put, of other ailments than skin cancer.
     
    The researchers noted that the US Navy had previously reported that its staff were at a high risk of skin cancer, but were healthier when looking at the bigger picture. The Swedish study seemed to echo that observation. 
     
    The finding left the Swedish scientists questioning the pervasive advice to stay out of the sun. The team, lead by chief doctor Pelle Lindqvist, noted that many public-health guidelines had been drawn up based on Australian research, but the sunshine there and up north differed when it came to UV rays.
     
    The advice may simply not be appropriate for Swedes.  
     
    "Following generally restrictive guidelines in Sweden, a country located at the northern latitude of between 55 degrees and 67 degrees with limited sunshine and a low UV index, might not be optimal," Lindqvist and his team wrote. 
     
    "In fact, our findings indicate that these guidelines may indeed be harmful in terms of overall health of the population." X

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    Josh Levin | Livin'n Astro 5.14c Rumney, NH

    Joshua Tree family couldn't be prouder of our Athlete Josh Levin for this outstanding send. Give it a look and send him some love on Facebook. 

     

    Josh Levin | Livin' Astro (5.14c) at Rumney from Ian MacLellan on Vimeo.

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